Cuba Holds No-News Elections

Voting in Cuba to support the government and Communist Party. File photo: juventudrebelde.cu

By Circles Robinson

HAVANA TIMES – Cuba holds neighborhood elections today to elect local delegates some of whom will make it to the city councils or even become national legislators. At most polling places voters will choose between two or more candidates all swearing to support the national government’s policies.

The polls opened at 7 a.m. Sunday in the 12,515 polling places throughout the country, reported the official Granma newspaper online.

While the Communist Party doesn’t directly nominate the candidates it has served as a shield to prevent any opposition candidates from appearing on the ballots throughout the country. Around 10% of the adult population belongs to the only allowed political party.

Campaigning, considered a vice of western democracies, is not allowed in Cuba nor debates about issues affecting the community, causes and possible solutions. Among those allowed to participate, support for the Castro led government and the economic and political system (“The Revolution”) is a given.

The only reason to choose one candidate over another is who is best qualified to carry out the Party directives and objectives. Those seeking to be a delegate only post their personal qualifications and a mug shot on a few local buildings for voters to make their choice.

Vote for the candidate who is the best qualified and loyal to the people.

A lack of enthusiasm for the elections has grown over the years as the delegates, no matter how well intentioned to address their communities problems, have virtually no power or access to resources.

The representatives file complaints to government ministries and State-run companies and then report back to the constituents that they are still waiting for a positive answer, sometimes several years or decades on. Frustration sets in and for that reason very few people want to take on the volunteer role.

Voting is not obligatory in Cuba but is highly encouraged by the Communist Party and its mass organizations as a show of support for the government and its policies.

  • pedroanimala

    this system is no different than that in puerto rico, usamerica’s treasured colony. there, regardles of who wins the election, utilizes the public coffers to assist only his party’ cronies.. all others are left to fend for themselves.

    • Carlyle MacDuff

      Since when did Puerto Rico suffer the imposition of a one party state, or are you merely venting spleen?

  • Gerard Matthews

    No independents then? What a very corrupt and one sided system! I despair and continue to worry for the entire people of Cuba, even those who have fallen under the spell of the Castro system, perhaps one day their real inner self will reawaken, or perhaps not especially if it is continually being surpressed and intimidated!

    • Joseph Marti

      We should be very worried indeed not only for Cubans, but for the spawn if its “government.” Having spread its pestilence to Venezuela, the unfortunate populace there is literally hanging on to the last threads “life.” Banana republics have their own bastardized brand of sham “elections.”

  • N.J. Marti

    Perhaps one day it will be more than decoration.