Che Guevara Was Not a Fan of Honors

By Martin Guevara 

Che Guevara doing voluntary work. Photo: radiorebelde.cu

HAVANA TIMES — Thousands of people who believe in revolutions but lack a living, honest leader will travel to Vallegrande, Bolivia to be there on Monday October 9th. On Sunday night, the Bolivian President will lavish a privileged group of guests who instead of turning down this expense, will go ready to down sumptuous dinners, exquisite wines and alcoholic drinks, parties, hotels, appearances and everything that Che precisely fought against: corruption, being comfortable, gentrification, double standards, manipulation and especially against what he disgusted the most:

Obedience and honors.

If you want to pay tribute in true Ernesto style, go into the jungle to fight and give up your comforts, don’t go and party it up.

Che was vastly more useful to the Revolution dead than alive. Alive, he wasn’t able to do anything great, he just moved the working class’ spirits, but he was really bothered by socialism’s flaws, the lies of USSR’s communism, Cuba’s bureaucracy, the corrupt, etc.

Many people didn’t want him to stay in Cuba, in the way of them enjoying the spoils. Naturally, the rebels had fought to live well, to remove the bourgeoisie from their seats in power and to move them to exile, jail or death and to stay in their neighborhoods with their homes and their comforts. This is what happened.

They didn’t make a revolution to go and do voluntary work, to eat the same as their working class neighbor. Che used to go and do voluntary work every weekend and he didn’t allow provisions or essentials to enter his home that everyone in Cuba didn’t have access to via the rations booklet. This “parallel drive” ended up being a nuisance for those who had fought to become the new oligarchy. He was too strict and not very corruptible, he didn’t sit well.

For those people who will go to the celebration events for the 50th anniversary of his death, who will spend the Bolivian people’s money, allowing themselves stay in expensive hotels, eating like pigs and drinking like Cossacks, appearing in photos, pretending that they care about the poor because they are going to have a good time.

For these people, Che dying was the best thing he could do, and as a result of his passing, all of these shameless people in his ranks, who betrayed him, who didn’t want him nearby, first mixed a tear of sorrow with a sigh of relief, then they stopped going to do voluntary work, they decked themselves out with homes, cars, ranches, luxuries that no ordinary Cuban had, and then, from that moment onwards, they could calmly take advantage of his life and death for their own benefit and began to idolize him.

From Fidel, Raul and all the fake communists in the world, to the shameless people who have made a profit off of his image.

And because people like to feel this mixture of the strong man, the successful man suffering, the contrast that can be seen in a hero’s tragedy, these crooked people came out winning. First they betrayed him, they abandoned him because he was very annoying as a critic and then they pocketed his divine corpse.

But, for destitute people who are always searching, he was made more human by dying with half of his body weight, hungry, tired, betrayed, in more misery than an unemployed worker, and then these people picked up on the strength of this image and made it a myth.

And what would Ernesto say to these hedonists who are going to take a sip from the honey his death created? What he always said about honors:

Les honneurs, ca m’emmerde (Honors bother me).

  • Hans Frankfort

    Well said, Martin Guevara. Are you related to Che’s family? I know he has family in Cuba.

    • editorht

      Martin is Che’s nephew.

      • Hans Frankfort

        Tell Martin he has a terrific uncle. I read Che’s biography written by his father; as a retired teacher, I wish I knew him as a child already demonstrating his independence at such a young age.

        • John Saynor

          I’m in the middle of a new book by Che’s brother entitled “My Brother: Che” A good read! Thanks, Martin, I appreciated your article..

          • Hans Frankfort

            Thanks for the tip, John. I am definitely interested to read this book. Many people know very little about Che as a person.

          • Joseph Marti

            True. And they conveniently ignore what a psychopathic murderer he was. Predators enjoy actively seeking prey, not sitting on their haunches in the warm sun. Suggest you broaden your “knowledge” beyond reading from his father, nephew, brother – oh yes, and the American movie you have cited. Do you need a recommendation on more scholarly resources?

          • Hans Frankfort

            For every revolutionary, soldier, leader, etc., there is a human story behind him or her whether from the left or right. You’re entitled to call him a murderer if you favor the 1%ers who have stolen, oppressed or even killed people to satisfy their own greed for decades before 1959! The Cuban Revolution got rid of these oppressors and chased them out to Miami if not executed. The internet is in your hands where you can find unlimited information on Che’s background and not necessarily from family and friends who actually know him better than you or anyone else! Cubans living on the island need to be aware of the US government’s true intentions and not let the Miami mafia stirred up by little Marco take advantage of this.