Playing in the Hands of the Enemy

August 17, 2013 | Print Print |

Rosa Martinez

The Cuban news media.

HAVANA TIMES — A lot has been said about the Cuban press and its journalists on social networks. Those employed by Cuba’s media have criticized the press they themselves work for, where they feel they are denied a true, active role.

Everyone feels entitled to criticize Cuban journalists, but they are probably the least to blame for the inaptly-called “secretiveness” that affects us so.

On more than one occasion, I myself have written about the many problems Cuba’s press faces. I have focused especially on how afraid the Party and Cuban government are of providing the enemy with information it can use against the country. This may have been a legitimate concern 10 years ago, but it doesn’t hold water in today’s world.

The enemy has no need of our media professionals or the information they divulge to get hold of the latest and most important news regarding Cuba. They have their own ways of getting this information.

What is a fact, however, is that anything we don’t report on will be reported on by others. That is to say, either we publish the embarrassing news about our country or someone else will do so, shaping these as they see fit.

We must put our feet on the ground once and for all and allow our journalists to dare, to take the risk of getting the country’s news out without fearing that someone will misjudge our country’s main achievements, or criticize the problems we still have after so many years of revolution.

It doesn’t matter what others have to say. What’s important are our lives, the lives of Cubans inside and outside the island, those of us who know well what our achievements and our shortcomings are.

Our press editors, and other officials higher up on the ladder, can decide to create an astute and incisive press to adequately inform the public about the country’s developments, or they can go on thinking that reporting on certain issues is playing into the hands of the enemy, an enemy that, thanks to Facebook, Twitter, Google, personal blogs and telephone calls knows more about our own house than we do.

 


What's your opinion?

  • Moses Patterson

    The Cuban press, controlled by the Castro regime, was prohibited from publishing negative news in Cuba primarily as a propaganda tool to manipulate the Cuban people. Fidel said it was to avoid giving the “enemy” information that could be used against the regime, but that was a simple-minded ruse. Every exile who escaped Cuba, even during the most isolated years, was able to tell the truth about life in Cuba. Outside of Cuba, with the exception of the crackpots who believe everything the Castros say, some of whom who comment here at HT, most people were easily and quickly informed about the blackouts, shortages, prostitution and government corruption. Only Cubans who read Granma or watched Cuban TV news were kept in the dark. The only thing different today is that information is more easily returned to Cuba and exchanged between Cubans. Now, when Cubans can read the Nuevo Herald in Miami from an Internet Café in Bayamo, there is no way to keep Cubans from learning the truth.

  • Marco Ordonez

    My opinión is that the Castro need to hurry or dust is what we will find in Cuba. I dont know if that is what their motive is, however it is pointing that way. I, myself, hate the Castros with every breath I inhale, however I am willing to look past that and use that energy to help my country and my fellow cubans. However the Castros are not much interested they are interested in staying in power and the fate of the country or the cuban people are not even in their radar.
    To be clear and honest…my name is Marcos Ordonez and I live in Florida, USA. I was born in Gibara, Holguin. Marcosaordonez@yahoo.com