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Regina Cano: I have lived my entire life in Havana, Cuba – the island from which I’ve still never left, and which I love. I was born on September 9, and my parents chose my name out of superstition, but my mother raised me outside the religion professed by her family. I studied accounting and finance at the University of Havana, a profession that I’m not engaged in for the time being, and that I substituted for doing crafts, some ceramics, and studying a little English and about painting. Ah! – concerning my picture: I identify with Rastafarian principles, but I am not one of them. I wear this cap from time to time, but I assure you I just didn't have a better picture.

Doing More in Cuba

January 21, 2013 | Print Print |

Regina Cano

regina1HAVANA TIMES — “Hacer +” (Do +) has appeared of late as graffiti and seems to be aimed at encouraging locals to get moving. Sometimes it appears (other times it disappears) in Alamar, the Havana neighborhood where I live.

Apparently an Alamar graffitist took it upon them self to motivate local residents through this work, made in haste and without templates. On one occasion this person included the full phrase, which read “DO + and TALK –.”

It seems to me that he/she is trying to reintroduce a phrase that was repeated by the Cuban media in the 1980’s as a part of the “rectification of errors” campaign, if my memory serves me correctly.

The phrase back then was “do more with less,” which perhaps was first said in some speech with the same intention of mobilizing citizens. However, I can’t say for sure this is where the anonymous graffiti artist got the idea.

At first I thought that the appearance of that phrase — which fills the streets of Alamar — could have been the work of local institutions since it encourages more work and saving time as a function of people’s own actions.

But people! Sometimes the authorities baffle me – like now, when they’re using up so much paint to cover up those words whenever they appear.

It’s too bad that the words of this type of thinking are being misconstrued because they’re actually in line with the appeals made by the government to the Cuban people to say what they think.

Our people need to do more — from the individual to us collectively — for our own development as a country.

We need to do more, from the material plane to the rational, spiritual and moral planes for the common good, which could lead to a more consistent behavior for the benefit of everyone.

Sadly, as long as there exist egos and individualism — causing some people to hinder others, tripping them up, sometimes even crushing their spirits in mini-wars won and lost at the personal level — then this country (our people) will remain on a low rung, far from achieving any victories.

 


What's your opinion?

  • Moses Patterson

    I thought out loud once to a Cuban friend once during my stay in Cuba wondering why there wasn’t more graffitti given the huge number of vacant buildings and virgin spaces ripe for ‘expression’. He laughed barely under his breath and answered…”Have you seen what spray paint costs?”. Duh.