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Dmitri Prieto-Samsonov: I define myself as being either Cuban-Russian or Russian-Cuban, indiscriminately. I was born in Moscow in 1972 of a Russian mother and a Cuban father. I lived in the USSR until I was 13, although I was already familiar with Cuba-- where we would take our vacation almost every year. I currently live on the fifth floor of an apartment building in Santa Cruz del Norte, near the sea. I’ve studied biochemistry and law in Havana and anthropology in London. I’ve written about molecular biology, philosophy and anarchism, although I enjoy reading more than writing. I am currently teaching in the Agrarian University of Havana. I believe in God and in the possibility of a free society. Together with other people, that’s what we’re into: breaking down walls and routines.

The New Cuba Says: Kill, God forgives

June 17, 2016 | Print Print |

Dmitri Prieto

HAVANA TIMES — A small businessman had this sign up on his stand, located on Havana’s Infanta Street.

A threatening portrayal of the new Cuban race, a fearful fragment of theology, which inverts St. Augustine de Hippo’s philosopy of “Love and do what you will.”

I was impressed by it. It had an excellent design, the stuff of my nightmares when I was a child.

According to Roberto Veiga and Lenier Gonzalez, who are today activists for Cuba Posible, Latin American gangs have wanted to bring their business to Cuba for years. Additionally, Gilbertman – the infamous fraudster of yankee Medicare and promoter of Cuban reggaeton – helped feed the young Cuban imagination with a dose of violent adrenaline.

However, even without gangs and Gilbertman, we know what the outcome of our social disaster is going to be.

A quick search on Google brought up the following:

“Kill, God forgives” is a song from the traditional band Trio Matamoros, who belonged to the golden age of Cuban music. In the early 2000s, a Cuban film also had this title.

The sign this businessman had up on display was in fact an (ammended) poster of this film. It had been ammended in a special way: references to the film had been covered masterfully in red paint so they couldn’t be seen at all. This wasn’t an act of censorship but of semantic reprofiling: the content of the poster no longer refers to the film, but communicates what the phrase in the title actually means.

You don’t have to go to El Salvador anymore to know what Cuba’s future looks like.


What's your opinion?

  • John Q Smith

    The new El Salvador…….. how lovely the thought. Seems Cuba does have something to lose.

  • Gerard Matthews

    O Cuba please do not become yet another lawless banana republic!

  • Ronin

    I hope from the bottom of my heart that this does not become true. I have always felt very safe walking on the streets in every part of Cuba I have been to, and that, is one of the most valuable assets Cuba has. I pray for a better future for Cuba and a safe haven for all lost souls :)